Author Topic: question for plumbers  (Read 218 times)

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Offline Alina.autocadTopic starter

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question for plumbers
« on: Jun 14, 2018, 02:49:05 PM »
Would it be allowed to use san tee coming off of waste line to a vertical vent line. See screenshot

Offline cadman mike

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Re: question for plumbers
« Reply #1 on: Jun 14, 2018, 04:49:16 PM »
Yes.  Also acceptable is a combination fitting (sanitary wye + a 45)
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Offline Steadtler

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Re: question for plumbers
« Reply #2 on: Jun 15, 2018, 02:15:53 AM »
A few reason for not doing it:

A santee laying on it's back is technically part of a waste system (waste flows through it) and as such should be oriented in the vertical only. 

If the vent is used as a cleanout, the entry to the waste system will not be at a desired 45 degrees and subject to increase blockages caused by build-up due to sharp entry edge downstream.

A santee if used underground as proposed, prevents installation of future fixtures such as a bar sink on the vent line.

Unless you have a very good reason for piping it that way, why risk having the inspector flag it as a violation and you end up having to change it -very expensive after the fact.

Use a combo with a quarter bend or come off the side with a rolled wye and short sweep.

 

Offline Steadtler

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Re: question for plumbers
« Reply #3 on: Jun 15, 2018, 04:17:52 AM »
Oops, I meant use a combo with an eighth bend and off to the side at 45 with a rolled wye and short sweep.

Offline Tstright

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Re: question for plumbers
« Reply #4 on: Jun 18, 2018, 05:47:50 PM »

Unless you have a very good reason for piping it that way, why risk having the inspector flag it as a violation and you end up having to change it -very expensive after the fact.


Under what code would this be flagged?
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Offline cadbyken

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Re: question for plumbers
« Reply #5 on: Jun 18, 2018, 06:34:23 PM »

Unless you have a very good reason for piping it that way, why risk having the inspector flag it as a violation and you end up having to change it -very expensive after the fact.


Under what code would this be flagged?
Inspectors don't follow codes, they follow their own rules.  Seen on more than one occasion they insisted all san systems be sloped at 1/4" per foot.   :o  ::)
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Offline Steadtler

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Re: question for plumbers
« Reply #6 on: Jun 18, 2018, 07:16:50 PM »
Under what code would this be flagged?

A better question is: On inspection day, will you have an inspector who will allow a santee to be installed horizontally in a drainage system? Do you have a code book ready which specifically allowis such an installation?

If the inspector tags it and concedes to your argument, will the inspector remember that situation fondly when it comes to overhead inspections?

It comes down to why risk an inspector tagging your project, making you look unprofessional and confrontational as well the possibility of having to spend money and time fixing a situation which shouldn't have been there in the first place.

If I were the inspector, I would tag the installation - the fitting is in a drainage system, regardless of the implied vent branch use, and the vertical to horizontal orientation of the santee is not listed as an approved fitting (UPC).


Offline Gil Navarro

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Re: question for plumbers
« Reply #7 on: Jun 18, 2018, 07:24:45 PM »
To the OP:
I've been a plumber for 30 years. Yes, what you've shown is an acceptable and common practice. Sometimes referred to as "line venting". As long as the vent stays vertical (45 degrees or more) until it is roughly 40" or so above the floor slab, at which point the vent can turn horizontally. I prefer to use a sweep elbow up, then a sanitary tee for the fixture branch, and carry the vent up off the top of the san tee, but when there is an elevation constrain preventing you to do that, I run it like you've shown.

Offline cadbob

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Re: question for plumbers
« Reply #8 on: Jun 18, 2018, 08:08:26 PM »
Tin Knocker here, and really have no business butting in :) But what you guy's are describing is sort of like a Sovent System? (Curious)
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Offline dopefish

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Re: question for plumbers
« Reply #9 on: Jun 21, 2018, 04:16:01 PM »
Steam Fitter here with no business butting in but I will do it anyways. Local codes and authority having jurisdiction always win out in the end. You can pose your question on the interwebs where everyone has an opinion. Or you could send that screen shot to the field foreman and as what their preferred method will be since they are the one doing the work and dealing with the inspector. And maybe ask them about their logic behind it and see if its specific to the area, inspector, personal preference, etc. Lot's of great knowledge locked in the installers brains. Especially plumbers.

Offline Naysh

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Re: question for plumbers
« Reply #10 on: Jun 21, 2018, 05:03:13 PM »
Gotta use a combo instead of san tee.  I made that mistake early on when I began detailing and was corrected.